Scientist: Comet probe should have had coloured stripes – Al Jazeera English

Fifteen months after the European Space Agency’s Philae probe made a historic landing on comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, Matt Taylor, a mission scientist, has told Al Jazeera that there are things the team would have done differently.In November 2014, the probe failed to lock itself on to the surface of the comet after its thruster and harpoons failed.Instead, it bounced off the comet, coming to land two hours later and about 1km from the original landing site.Space probe successfully lands on comet”Maybe [we should have] painted the lander [with] yellow and pink stripes to make it easier to see on the surface!” said Taylor.

Source: Scientist: Comet probe should have had coloured stripes – Al Jazeera English

Mental health and debt problems: ‘A marriage made in hell’ – BBC News

Much has been written about the easy availability of debt at a time of record low interest rates.

The latest data showed that consumer credit was growing at the fastest pace in a decade.

The consumer boom of recent years, with memories of the financial crash apparently fading, has been well documented.

Not so much has been written or analysed on the impact of debt on people’s health. That’s what one leading personal finance expert wants to put right.

Source: Mental health and debt problems: ‘A marriage made in hell’ – BBC News

Canadian household debt rises to new record high

Canadian household debt rose to a new record high in the fourth quarter of last year, fuelled in large part by mortgage growth.

Statistics Canada said Friday that total household credit market debt, which includes consumer credit and mortgage and non-mortgage loans, increased 1.2 per cent to $1.923 trillion at the end of last year.

The total included $573.6 billion in consumer credit debt and $1.262 trillion in mortgage debt.

Source: Canadian household debt rises to new record high

More than 8m UK adults have ‘problem debt’

One in six UK adults have financial worries, with households in Sandwell in the West Midlands and parts of the valleys of south Wales being the most likely to be overburdened, according to latest research.

The analysis indicated a link between debt levels and having children, with becoming a parent raising your likelihood of debt problems by more than 50%. The figures show that while 19% of adults with one or two children were defined as over-indebted, this increased to 26% among those with three or more. More than one in four (28%) single parents are living with problem debt, equating to a million single parents.

Renters are twice as likely to be over-indebted as those who own their home, at 25% against 12%, the MAS said. For those renting social housing this increases to nearly one in three, at 29% against 21% of those renting privately.

Source: More than 8m UK adults have ‘problem debt’ | Money | The Guardian

Did the Trusted Ptolemy Murder Alexander the Great? | Ancient Origins

Alexander the Great was the ruler of one of the biggest empires in the ancient world. However, he died before his 33rd birthday, leaving behind a legend. He was careful and apparently avoided many assassination attempts during his life. Who could possibly be the person who murdered him? Was it Ptolemy, a man who had gained Alexander’s trust?

Source: Did the Trusted Ptolemy Murder Alexander the Great? | Ancient Origins

Hubble breaks cosmic distance record

By pushing the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope to its limits astronomers have shattered the cosmic distance record by measuring the distance to the most remote galaxy ever seen in the Universe. This galaxy existed just 400 million years after the Big Bang and provides new insights into the first generation of galaxies. This is the first time that the distance of an object so far away has been measured from its spectrum, which makes the measurement extremely reliable. The results will be published in the Astrophysical Journal.

Source: Hubble breaks cosmic distance record

Nanoparticles used to take on late-stage liver cancer

Treating late-stage liver cancer can be extremely difficult, with drugs that prove effective in healthy organs causing high levels of toxicity when introduced to cirrhotic livers. A newly-developed nanoparticle delivery system could improve the situation, with early tests showing it to be effective as a non-toxic treatment in experiments with laboratory mice.

Source: Nanoparticles used to take on late-stage liver cancer

Cambridgeshire plesiosaur ‘sea monster’ could be ‘new species’ – BBC News

Jurassic “sea monster” found in Cambridgeshire could prove to be a new species of plesiosaur, scientists said.Oxford archaeologists discovered the 165 million-year-old reptile bones at Must Farm quarry near Whittlesey.Dr Carl Harrington and his team dug up more than 600 pieces of bone as well as the skull, still preserved in clay.”Eve”, described as “a fantastic fossil”, has anatomical features only before seen in plesiosaurs half her size, a palaeontologist said.Plesiosaurs were sea creatures that lived at the time of the dinosaurs.

Source: Cambridgeshire plesiosaur ‘sea monster’ could be ‘new species’ – BBC News

Laser pulses keep superconductors working at higher temperatures

An international team of scientists led by the Max Planck Institute in Hamburg, Germany, has found a new mechanism allowing superconducting materials to maintain their properties at much higher temperatures than was previously possible. The advance brings the dream of mainstream maglev trains and highly energy-efficient electronics a little closer to reality.

Source: Laser pulses keep superconductors working at higher temperatures