Cassini finds global ocean in Saturn’s moon Enceladus | Astronomy.com

A global ocean lies beneath the icy crust of Saturn’s geologically active moon Enceladus, according to new research using data from NASA’s Cassini mission.Researchers found that the magnitude of the moon’s slight wobble, as it orbits Saturn, can only be accounted for if its outer ice shell is not frozen solid to its interior, meaning a global ocean must be present.

Source: Cassini finds global ocean in Saturn’s moon Enceladus | Astronomy.com

Whiteout: new Scottish thesaurus has 421 words for snow | Books | The Guardian

The claim that the Inuit have 50 words for snow has endured for decades, but it now looks as if the Scots have beaten that figure. Researchers on a new Scots thesaurus say they have found more than 400 Scots words for the white stuff, from “feefle” to “flindrikin”, “spitters” to “snaw-pouther”.

Source: Whiteout: new Scottish thesaurus has 421 words for snow | Books | The Guardian

HubbleSite – NewsCenter – NASA’s Hubble Finds Supernova Star System Linked to Potential ‘Zombie Star’

Astronomers using NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope for the first time have spotted a star system that later produced an unusual supernova explosion of a white dwarf, the stripped-down core of an ordinary star at the end of its life.

Source: HubbleSite – NewsCenter – NASA’s Hubble Finds Supernova Star System Linked to Potential ‘Zombie Star’ (08/06/2014) – The Full Story

How Three Guys With $10K and Decades-Old Data Almost Found the Higgs Boson First | WIRED

On a fall morning in 2009, a team of three young physicists huddled around a computer screen in a small office overlooking Broadway in New York. They were dressed for success—even the graduate student’s shirt had buttons—and a bottle of champagne was at the ready. With a click of the mouse, they hoped to unmask a fundamental particle that had eluded physicists for decades: the Higgs boson.Of course, these men weren’t the only physicists in pursuit of the Higgs boson. In Geneva, a team of hundreds of physicists with an $8 billion machine called the Large Hadron Collider also was in the hunt. But shortly after starting for the first time, the LHC had malfunctioned and went offline for repairs, opening a window three guys at NYU hoped to take advantage of.The key to their strategy was a particle collider that had been dismantled in 2001 to make room for the more powerful LHC. For $10,000 in computer time, they would attempt to show that the Large Electron-Positron collider had been making dozens of Higgs bosons without anybody noticing.

Source: How Three Guys With $10K and Decades-Old Data Almost Found the Higgs Boson First | WIRED

Thousands of microbes found in house dust – BBC News

The dust in our homes contains an average of 9,000 different species of microbes, a study suggests.Researchers from the University of Colorado at Boulder analysed the dust found in 1,200 households across the United States.They discovered that the types of bacteria and fungi varied depending on where the home was located, who lived there and whether pets were present.

Source: Thousands of microbes found in house dust – BBC News

The dementia epidemic: is it really stabilising? – Health & Families – Life and Style – The Independent

A new study suggests that dementia rates aren’t increasing, but if we take a look at the age of those studied, the living conditions of those born pre and post-war plays a huge role. As younger generations become less healthy, it is likely to increase in the future

Source: The dementia epidemic: is it really stabilising? – Health & Families – Life and Style – The Independent

‘Lonely Mountain’ on Dwarf Planet Ceres Shines in Jaw-Dropping Photos

A “lonely mountain” stands unaccompanied on the icy gray surface of the dwarf planet Ceres, in amazing new photographs from NASA’s Dawn spacecraft.The mountain, with an altitude of 21,120 feet (6,437 meters), is one of many gorgeous features captured in the new images, which Dawn took on Aug. 19. Shining craters, sloping ridges and round dimples also cover the surface of Ceres, the largest object in the asteroid belt. We at Space.com combined the photos into a video that explores the new Ceres images in detail.

Source: ‘Lonely Mountain’ on Dwarf Planet Ceres Shines in Jaw-Dropping Photos