Effect of the Ebola-virus-disease epidemic on malaria case management in Guinea, 2014: a cross-sectional survey of health facilities – The Lancet Infectious Diseases

The reduction in the delivery of malaria care because of the Ebola-virus-disease epidemic threatens malaria control in Guinea. Untreated and inappropriately treated malaria cases lead to excess malaria mortality and more fever cases in the community, impeding the Ebola-virus-disease response.

Source: Effect of the Ebola-virus-disease epidemic on malaria case management in Guinea, 2014: a cross-sectional survey of health facilities – The Lancet Infectious Diseases

Cancer cells can be programmed to become normal again – Quartz

Cancer cells are like normal cells—they just grow abnormally. That is why treatments that selectively try to get rid of cancer cells while protecting normal cells don’t work that well. What if we could fix the abnormal growth without having to kill the cells?That is what a team of researchers at the Mayo Clinic have just done. Their lab tests on human cells from breast and bladder cancers show that, with a relatively simple intervention, they can program cancer cells to grow normally again.

Source: Cancer cells can be programmed to become normal again – Quartz

#HeritageIndex – RSA

Really interesting map on hertiage around the UK and what it is like in your area.

The RSA is collaborating with the Heritage Lottery Fund to better understand the links between heritage and identity at the local scale. We’ve analysed over 100 datasets to produce a Heritage Index to help people understand local heritage assets and activities, and access relevant data through a single site. Data ranges from the length of canals and size of protected wildlife sites, through to the number of historic local businesses and the proportion of residents visiting museums and archives.The Index i

Source: Heritage, Identity and Place – RSA

Latest images of Pluto’s flowing ice | Science Wire | EarthSky

The images from New Horizons’ July 14 sweep past Pluto continue to come in. Among the recent discoveries: flowing nitrogen ice on Pluto! These exotic ices flow across Pluto’s at one edge of its bright heart-shaped area. Scientists had hoped to find signs of an active surface on Pluto, but, still, they were wowed by evidence of flowing ice.

Source: Latest images of Pluto’s flowing ice | Science Wire | EarthSky

Smartphone now most popular way to browse internet – Ofcom report | Technology | The Guardian

Smartphones are the UK’s most popular device for getting online for the first time, according to industry monitor Ofcom.The change has largely been driven by our increased appetite for video, and its availability with the expansion of high-speed 4G data networks. Over the past 12 months this has allowed many more people to watch video clips from YouTube or Vine and TV on-demand services such as BBC iPlayer and Netflix on the go.

Source: Smartphone now most popular way to browse internet – Ofcom report | Technology | The Guardian

NASA considers new missions to Uranus and/or Neptune –

On the 26th anniversary of Voyager 2’s historic Neptune flyby, NASA Planetary Science Division director Jim Green asked the agency’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) to study possible flagship missions to either Uranus or Neptune or both.Flagship missions are the largest and most expensive of NASA’s solar system exploration program. The other two mission classes are the medium cost New Frontiers class and the lowest cost Discovery program.

Source: NASA considers new missions to Uranus and/or Neptune –

Fly With New Horizons During Stunning Pluto Encounter : Discovery News

NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft made history when it zipped past Pluto and its system of moons during a hair-raising encounter on July 14, coming within 7,800 miles of the dwarf planet’s surface.PHOTOS: NASA’s Mission to Pluto by the NumbersNow, the mission team has stitched together the observations made by the probe during its historic flyby, creating a stunning high-resolution view of what it looks like to barrel through the Kuiper Belt at 31,000 miles per hour:

Source: Fly With New Horizons During Stunning Pluto Encounter : Discovery News

Council tax is now Britain’s biggest problem debt – how to get help – Mirror Online

Four years ago, we were most likely to struggle with debts from overspending on credit cards and loans.But according to Citizens Advice, in 2014-15 debtors are dragged down by just paying the everyday bills.Senior policy researcher Pippa Lane said: “Citizens Advice has seen a shift in the kind of debt people have now compared to five years ago.”Where people used to seek advice for problems with consumer debt like credit cards, overdrafts and personal loans, now the biggest issues are council tax arrears, fuel debts, and rent arrears.“People are increasingly struggling to pay their basic costs of living, and falling into debt as a result.”

Source: Council tax is now Britain’s biggest problem debt – how to get help – Mirror Online

Will Ofcom’s love affair with mobile data kill the wireless radio star? | Ars Technica UK

Last month, the results of the EU’s public consultation on the 700MHz UHF spectrum were published, revealing that it intends to release the spectrum as “part of a coordinated approach” across the European Union. The UK telecommunications watchdog Ofcom reached a similar decision at the tail end of last year, noting that it planned to let mobile operators use the spectrum by the year 2022. While that’s great news for people with poor mobile reception (700MHz is perfect for penetrating walls and other obstacles), there will be a number of collateral casualtiesOfcom’s report notes, “Digital Terrestrial Television (DTT) and wireless communication for theatrical, musical, and sporting events (PMSE services) currently use the 700 MHz band.” While most of the discussion around wireless spectrum tends to revolve around TV broadcasting and mobile networks, the “theatrical, musical, and sporting events” part of the equation largely gets ignored, despite being just as culturally significant (if not more so) than the other high-profile spectrum users.Many current wireless systems used in live performance (vocal microphones, in-ear monitors, wireless guitar packs) operate in UHF bands IV and V (470MHz-854MHz). With 800MHz now off the table, and 700MHz soon to be handed over to high-traffic mobile providers, pro audio company Shure has launched a campaign to ensure that Ofcom finds a suitable place in the spectrum for wireless audio systems. While it’s easy to be cynical about a very large and wealthy company that sells wireless audio products fighting to save the life of wireless audio products, Shure does raise a few worthy issues.The UHF spectrum used by wireless microphones in the production of TV content is the same spectrum that is used to stream or broadcast that content to millions of consumers. Without dedicated spectrum for wireless audio gear, Shure says, the quality of that content could be compromised. While that sounds rather dramatic, these are real issues for the entertainment industries. The British Entertainment Industry Radio Group (BEIRG) released a statement last year, claiming that they could be forced to operate in less than two thirds of the spectrum to which they currently have access, and urging Ofcom to do something about it.

Source: Will Ofcom’s love affair with mobile data kill the wireless radio star? | Ars Technica UK

Do Brits Communicate Differently Than Italians? Mobile App drupe Tops Half… — TEL AVIV, Israel, August 13, 2015 /PRNewswire/ —

Italians and French are communicating less on weekends (20% decrease), whereas Mexicans are communicating almost the same as they do all week long. And what about Americans and Brits? A good place in the middle.French clearly favor the good old SMS, while Italians would rather talk on the phone. And Israelis? They will communicate as much as they can over WhatsApp.Americans use messaging apps mostly in the evenings, whereas Israelis favor communicating via messaging apps during work hours (but start calling during the late afternoon).People in India communicate relatively a lot during work hours, while Americans are much more “silent” during their workday.Overall it’s visible that while VOIP communications get a lot of attention, the traditional GSM voice calls aren’t going anywhere – It would be interesting looking into this trend down the road as VOIP quality continues to improve.

Source: Do Brits Communicate Differently Than Italians? Mobile App drupe Tops Half… — TEL AVIV, Israel, August 13, 2015 /PRNewswire/ —

TransUnion expects spike in debt delinquencies in Alberta, Saskatchewan – Business – CBC News

Alberta and Saskatchewan will soon see a ‘sharp’ increase in the number of people falling behind on their debts for the rest of this year, credit agency TransUnion says.The debt monitor said in a study released Wednesday that it is expecting the number of consumer credit delinquencies to increase by double-digits in Saskatchewan, and as much as 60 per cent in parts of Alberta.

Source: TransUnion expects spike in debt delinquencies in Alberta, Saskatchewan – Business – CBC News

Beyond Pluto: 5 things left to explore in our solar system – Technology & Science – CBC News

With New Horizons’ flyby of Pluto, spacecraft launched by humans have now visited the nine biggest planets (dwarf or otherwise) orbiting the sun.Publications such as the New York Times have called Pluto “the last of known worlds to be explored” and “the end of an era of planetary exploration.”Alan Stern, principal investigator of the New Horizons mission, has called the mission “the last picture show.”

Source: Beyond Pluto: 5 things left to explore in our solar system – Technology & Science – CBC News

Boater accidentally drains stretch of Grand Union Canal – Leighton Buzzard Observer

So this is what happens..

The Canal River Trust has been alerted after ‘boater error’ led to a strange sight yesterday.The Cooks Wharf area of the Grand Union Canal, which sits just outside Cheddington on the way to Marsworth, drained away after a boater left a lock gate paddle open.The gates control the flow of water in the lock.

Source: Boater accidentally drains stretch of Grand Union Canal – Leighton Buzzard Observer

The recovery seems to be strong – but a rate rise will bring it crashing down | Business | The Guardian

The impact from low oil prices on North sea revenues is an interesting angle, not really widely discussed and impact will be lagged. Thought provoking.

Britain’s growth rate returned to Mach 2 speed in the spring and early summer. That’s the consensus among City analysts ahead of official figures out this week, handing George Osborne another golden arrow with which to shoot down his critics.It is the re-emergence of the big-spending consumer (who snaps up a new bed and sofa while ordering a case of wine) that is likely to have prevented the UK economy from repeating the lacklustre growth rate of 0.4% seen in the first three months of the year.Most analysts expect the Office for National Statistics to report on Tuesday that GDP jumped by 0.7% for the three months to the end of June. That’s an annualised GDP increase of 2.8%, which is enough to put supersonic Britain streets ahead of its developed-world rivals.Yet a peek beneath the data reveals a picture that Osborne and the interest-rate-setters in Threadneedle Street ignore at their peril.Based on what we already know from the official figures and those published for individual industry sectors, the main boost to the second quarter figures will come from the very same source of weakness in the first quarter – the North Sea.Last year saw a dive in North Sea oil and gas production as operators reacted to the dramatic fall in crude oil prices. In recent months, rigs taken out of action for maintenance have come back on stream, encouraged by a moderate recovery in prices (though they are falling again now, along with other commodities) and a more generous tax regime announced by Osborne in the March budget. The result was an enormous 9% increase in output between the first and second quarters.

Source: The recovery seems to be strong – but a rate rise will bring it crashing down | Business | The Guardian