Pluto’s Weirdly Young Surface Doesn’t Make Sense

Scientists with NASA’s New Horizons mission are puzzling over how a world that never gets more sun than Earth at twilight is reshaping its surface, filling in craters, cracking its crust and building towering mountains and smooth hills.

Scientists with NASA’s New Horizons mission are puzzling over how a world that never gets more sun than Earth at twilight is reshaping its surface, filling in craters, cracking its crust and building towering mountains and smooth hills.

Source: Pluto’s Weirdly Young Surface Doesn’t Make Sense

Authentic Chicken Curry

1/4 cup olive oil

1 medium onion

8 chicken thighs, skinned (bones optional)

2 plum tomatoes (diced)

1 tbsp finely minced ginger

1 tbsp finely minced garlic

1/2 stick cinnamon

1 tbsp ground cumin

1 tbsp ground coriander seeds

1/2 tsp turmeric

3/4 tsp cayenne

1 1/2 tsp paprika

1 1/2 tsp salt

1 1/2 cups water

1 or 2 fresh green chillies (optional)

lemon

fresh cilantro

2 tbsp yoghurt (optional)

via Authentic Chicken Curry.

Crispy Beetroot Cutlet | Recipes from Sunanda’s Kitchen

Ingredients

For Filling

Beetroot – 2 Large size, grated

Carrot – 1 large, grated

Potato – 1 Large

Green peas – 1/2 cup, optional

Peanut – 2 tbsp, roasted and peeled

Raisins – 1 tbsp, soaked

Ginger paste – 1 tbsp

Green chilli – 3 Chopped

Fennel seed – 1/2 tsp

Roasted Spices – Cumin, Coriander, Fennel seeds in equal amount

Turmeric powder – 1 tsp

Chilli powder – 1 tsp

Salt – As per taste

For Coating

Cornflour – 1 tbsp

Flour – 1 tbsp

Water – 1/4 cup

Egg Beaten – 1 no, optional if we are not making it pure vegetarian

Oil for Frying

via Crispy Beetroot Cutlet | Recipes from Sunanda’s Kitchen.

BBC – Food – Recipes : Apple crumble

This recipe is an all-time favourite of those hankering after the ultimate quick and easy dessert. Serve with nostalgia.

Ingredients

For the crumble

300g/10½oz plain flour, sieved pinch of salt

175g/6oz unrefined brown sugar

200g/7oz unsalted butter, cubed at room temperature

Knob of butter for greasing

For the filling

450g/1lb apples, peeled, cored and cut into 1cm/½in pieces

50g/2oz unrefined brown sugar

1 tbsp plain flour

1 pinch of ground cinnamon

via BBC – Food – Recipes : Apple crumble.

BBC – Food – Recipes : How to make trifle

This recipe uses ready made custard and cake, leaving you time to make some homemade jelly with berries and apple juice.

Ingredients

For the base

500g/1lb 2oz frozen summer fruit (raspberries, blackberries, strawberries, blackcurrants and redcurrants work well)

50g/2oz caster sugar, or more to taste

2 tbsp blackcurrant or raspberry liqueur (cassis or Chambord)

500ml/18fl oz cloudy apple juice

5 sheets leaf gelatine

250g/9oz madiera cake

For the custard

250g/9oz mascarpone

500ml/18floz ready-made vanilla custard

For the topping

300ml/½ pint whipping cream

handful toasted almonds or hazelnuts, to serve

via BBC – Food – Recipes : How to make trifle.

Is this the BEST Chicken Madras Recipe Ever?

Chicken Madras Ingredients:

4 chicken breasts, one per person!

3 tbsp vegetable oil

2 onions, peeled and finely chopped

2cm block of fresh root ginger, peeled and grated

2-3 garlic cloves, peeled and finely chopped – Depends how much garlic you like. Personally I don’t like it to be over-powering

Sea salt and black pepper

400g ripe tomatoes, chopped

300ml water

Good old Gordon

1 tsp garam masala

Coriander leaves, to garnish

The following spices can be varied to your own personal taste, but if this is your first time with this recipe, then I’d suggest the following:

2–4 red chillies, finely chopped – You can de-seed if you prefer, but this will make it not as spicy

2 tsp ground cumin

1 tsp ground coriander

1 tsp ground turmeric

1–3 tsp (or more!) hot chilli powder, to taste – Adding more or less will vary the hotness

6–8 curry leaves

Juice of half a lemon or lime (you can use vinegar here instead, but not both)

via Is this the BEST Chicken Madras Recipe Ever?.

BBC News – Eurozone debt web: Who owes what to whom?

The circle below shows the gross external, or foreign, debt of some of the main players in the eurozone as well as other big world economies. The arrows show how much money is owed by each country to banks in other nations. The arrows point from the debtor to the creditor and are proportional to the money owed as of the end of June 2011. The colours attributed to countries are a rough guide to how much trouble each economy is in.

via BBC News – Eurozone debt web: Who owes what to whom?.

How Do Robins And Other Birds Find Worms? | A Moment of Science – Indiana Public Media

Everyone is familiar with the sight of robins hopping around the yard, peering into the grass or “head-cocking” to locate a nice juicy worm. In no time, they find their prey and fly off with a mouthful.

Cues to find prey

Birds are known to use visual, auditory, and possibly vibrations or tactile cues to find prey, but vision is predominant.The way the robins turn their head when searching for food suggests they could be using visual or auditory cues, but it wasn’t until scientists tested robins in the lab that we really knew for sure how they find worms.

Testing the birds

Birds were placed in aviaries where they could be given buried mealworms in trays of dirt.To test if they were using scent to locate their prey, birds were offered trays with buried live, moving worms and dead ones. Robins found the live worms more often, suggesting they were not using scent.In the next test, they were given hanging food trays to keep them from touching the soil with their feet and detecting the worm’s vibrations. The trays did not affect their ability to find the worms, suggesting they do not use tactile cues.

Sound Cues

When cardboard was used as a barrier to block visual cues, the birds could still find the worms. That meant they were using another sense. A last experiment used white noise to block sound cues and the birds had more difficulty finding the worms.The research concluded that robins could use either visual or auditory cues alone to find worms in the soil, but probably use both. So the next time you see a robin “head-cocking” you can be fairly sure it’s listening and looking for those mouthwatering treats!

via How Do Robins And Other Birds Find Worms? | A Moment of Science – Indiana Public Media.